What the Leading COVID Vaccine Contenders Still Need to Tell the Public

The Most Revolutionary Act

Given how much we don’t yet know, it’s unclear why those of us asking for more information about the leading COVID vaccines are being marginalised. We’re simply exercising our right to informed consent.

The race is on

When everyone’s trying to pick potential winners of the global race to produce COVID vaccines, spare a thought for those of us who are the guinea pigs. We, the public, as well as concerned doctors and other health professionals, need to be crystal clear about what information we need to give consent — assuming vaccine rollout is not made mandatory in your country or state.

This is a bigger ask than it might be if we had functioning democracies. But in most countries that have enjoyed democratic governance in recent years, emergency measures granted by the World Health Organization’s characterisation of COVID-19 as a “pandemic”…

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Former Officer Warns Military of Pitfalls Surrounding COVID Vaccine Mandate

The Most Revolutionary Act

By Pam Long

Fast tracking the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine for a probable military mandate creates unparalleled dilemma for commanders who will face prodigious legal, medical, safety and ethical questions.

As the former commanding officer of the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment of the 36th Medical Evacuation Battalion, I recommend urgent caution for military commanders with orders to have all soldiers vaccinated with the experimental SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

My concerns include the legality of a mandate, lack of treatment protocols and surveillance for adverse reactions, and a research-based risk assessment.

Legal challenges to a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine mandate

Under Emergency Use Authorization, state governments cannot mandate the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in the civilian sector. A military mandate would require demonstration that the military sector had a compelling justification for a mandate. Healthy, young service members are not an at-risk group as they are not obese, not over the age of 65 and do not have comorbidities…

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