New super-enzyme eats plastic bottles six times faster

The Most Revolutionary Act

Just Sayin’

Breakthrough that builds on plastic-eating bugs first discovered by Japan in 2016 promises to enable full recycling

A large pile of plastic bottles
Plastic bottles make up almost one sixth of the world’s annual plastic production. Photograph: Jeff Morgan/Alamy Stock Photo

A super-enzyme that degrades plastic bottles six times faster than before has been created by scientists and could be used for recycling within a year or two.

The super-enzyme, derived from bacteria that naturally evolved the ability to eat plastic, enables the full recycling of the bottles. Scientists believe combining it with enzymes that break down cotton could also allow mixed-fabric clothing to be recycled. Today, millions of tonnes of such clothing is either dumped in landfill or incinerated.

Plastic pollution has contaminated the whole planet, from the Arctic to the deepest oceans, and people are now known to consume and breathemicroplastic particles. It is currently very difficult to break…

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Oregon: Activist Groups Distribute Supplies to Families Displaced by Wildfires

The Most Revolutionary Act

‘A huge difference’: Volunteers mobilise in Oregon fire aftermath

By Shane Burley
Al Jazeera

Portland, United States – Hunter Bombadier has spent the better part of the past year protesting for an end to police violence and anti-Black racism – and supporting communities hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic.

That is how the 33-year-old member of Symbiosis, a network of left-wing organisations across the United States, was ready to help when massive wildfires broke out south of Portland, Oregon, forcing tens of thousands of people to flee their homes.

“We were able to use the programming and infrastructure we already had,” Bombadier told Al Jazeera in a recent phone interview.

The group had a system in place to provide needed supplies to communities affected by COVID-19, Bombadier explained, and had created relationships with other activist organisations to coordinate their efforts.

The groups use multiple supply drop-off sites throughout the state…

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Assange: Explosive Testimonies Undermine US Indictment and Provide Grounds for Dismissal

The Most Revolutionary Act

Week three of the hearings at the Old Bailey for Julian Assange‘s extradition to the US heard testimony from a computer security expert that may prove to be critical. That testimony could be used to undermine the first indictment raised against the WikiLeaks founder and therefore weaken the entire case.

Other testimonies may form the basis by which the US extradition request could be dismissed.

No Assange-Manning conspiracy

Computer forensic expert Patrick Eller was formerly lead digital forensics examiner with the US Army’s Criminal Investigation Command in Virginia. On Friday 25 September, his written statement to the court and live testimony covered a number of crucial aspects relating to the first indictment of alleged computer misuse raised against Assange.

The indictment claims that Assange assisted former US Army intelligence analyst and whistleblower Chelsea Manning to crack a password so she could anonymously access sensitive computer files. But Eller’s testimony…

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Philadelphia Housing Activists Claim Victory After Six Month Direct Action Campaign

The Most Revolutionary Act

Photo: Hughe Dylan/Philly Voice

Philadelphia Housing Action claims victory after 6 month direct action campaign forces City to relinquish 50 vacant homes to community land trust.

In largest self-organized housing takeover in the country, 50 homeless mothers and children to remain in 15 vacant city-owned homes, homeless protest encampments to take additional houses.

On Friday, September 25, Philadelphia Housing Action and the City of Philadelphia reached a tentative agreement to resolve a months long standoff over the fate of two homeless protest encampments and 15 vacant city-owned homes occupied by mothers and children. The unprecedented agreement to give homeless activists 50 vacant, viable homes comes after many months of housing takeovers, protest encampments, eviction defense of the houses, barricaded and blockaded streets and mass mobilizations to defend the encampments.

“It’s a good start but it’s also not enough,” said Black and Brown Workers Cooperative organizer Sterling Johnson.  “There was already…

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Vendana Shiva: Fighting Climate Change Requires a Paradigm Shift

The Most Revolutionary Act

Inner Climate Change Documentary

Climate Change and Consciousness (2020)

Film Review

This documentary is a video record of the remarkable Climate Change and Consciousness conference that took place in Findhorn Scotland in April last year. Along with other communities, Taranaki climate activists have formed a local hub to carry on the work started at Findhorn. See https://www.facebook.com/groups/2319312678282465/

The purpose of the conference was to explore the changes in consciousness that must occur to win public support for the drastic changes that are needed. The film presents a range of viewpoints and approaches to the topic.

My favorite presenter was Indian environmentalist Vendana Shiva, who stressed the following points:

  • We’ve all be raised to view the world as a mechanical object and ourselves as cogs in that machine – this must change – we must start to see ourselves as partners with nature rather than nature’s master.
  • We must fully appreciate…

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Nicaragua, the Country that Didn’t Swallow the Covid Blue Pill

The Most Revolutionary Act

Jorge Capelán

Internationalist 360°

Children of a barrio in Managua celebrating the anniversary of the excecution of dictator Anastasio Somoza García in 1956. (Photo: Jorge Capelán)

No curfews, no lockdowns, no “stay at home”, no psychosis, no covid-calamities. There has been much talk about the Swedish corona strategy but the strategy of Nicaragua has been by far more successful, with many fewer deaths, no “economic rescue” for big banks and only limited damage to small and medium sized businesses.

In the midst of the worldwide economic debacle caused by covid hysteria, food self-sufficient, small business based, impoverished Nicaragua, has seen its exports grow over 10% the past 8 months because it did not shut down its economy. Precisely because it sustained its economy, it has not had to take on huge loans in order to face the emergency. Thus, its foreign debt levels remain within a readily manageable range, below…

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Sri Lanka returns containers of illegal waste to Britain

The Most Revolutionary Act

A Sri Lankan customs official inspects a waste container in Colombo

Akewusolaf

Sri Lanka has shipped back to Britain container-loads of waste that the government said was brought into the island in violation of international laws governing the shipping of hazardous material.

The 21 containers — holding up to 260 tonnes of rubbish — first arrived by ship in the capital Colombo’s main port between September 2017 and March 2018, customs told AFP, adding that they departed Sri Lanka on Saturday.

They were meant to carry used mattresses, carpets and rugs, but had also contained hospital waste, officials said.

“The shipper had agreed to take back these 21 containers,” customs spokesman Sunil Jayaratne told AFP on Sunday.

“We are working to secure compensation from those responsible for getting the containers into the country.”

Customs did not reveal the type of hospital waste, but previous illegally imported containers had included rags…

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Major banks, food and cosmetics brands linked to massive abuses in palm oil industry

The Most Revolutionary Act

RT | September 27, 2020

Renowned food and cosmetics firms could have used palm oil produced by workers suffering from various abuses – from threats to rape – while global lenders finance the exploiting companies, AP reported, citing its investigation.

According to the report, based on accounts of over 130 current and former workers from two dozen palm oil companies in Malaysia and Indonesia, as well as rights activists’ claims and journalists’ first-hand experiences, millions of people may be exploited at the palm oil plantations. The long list of alleged mistreatment includes threats and being held against one’s will, while the most severe abuses include child labor, slavery and allegations of rape.

While palm oil is widely used in a long list of daily products, it is sometimes hard to trace as it can be found under various names on labels. However, the most recent data from producers, traders and…

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Brazil: Volkswagen Acknowledges Persecution and Torture of Workers

The Most Revolutionary Act

Image of a Volkswagen company factory in Brazil in the early 1970s.

Image of a Volkswagen company factory in Brazil in the early 1970s. | Photo: Twitter/ @revistaforum

Telesur

The company collaborated with the military dictatorship in actions that affected its workers.

Volkswagen announced that it agreed with the State of São Paulo to compensate its former workers for the damages it caused them during the military dictatorship that ruled Brazil between 1964 and 1985.

to grant US$6.5 million to promote initiatives related to the defense of human rights and the investigation of crimes committed during the dictatorship. Just over US$3 million of that amount will go to former workers who reported violations of their human rights.

“With this agreement, Volkswagen wants to promote the clarification of the human rights violations of that time,” the German company stated and stressed that it is “the first foreign company to face its past in a transparent way.”

The work of the Truth Commission, which was…

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Hidden History: The 21 Korean War POWs Who Defected to China

The Most Revolutionary Act

They Chose China

Directed by Shui-Bo-Wong (2006)

Film Review

This documentary is about 21 US Korean War POWs who chose not to repatriate to the US when the Korean armistice was signed in 1953. Initially there were 23. The first two returned to the US in the early fifties, where they were court martialed and given 10 and 20 year prison sentences.

For the most part, the US media echoed Senator Joseph McCarthy’s view that the 21 who remained in China were Communist traitors. However in a 1954 interview about their reasons for defecting, most cited their opposition to imperialist wars or to McCarthy’s witch hunt against US political dissidents, which they equated with fascism.

The 21 were also clearly influenced by their extremely positive treatment during their three years in captivity. The Chinese who ran the North Korean POW camps allowed them to have American food, as well as…

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Nations Should Begin Removing Facebook, Twitter, and Google from Their Information Space

Piazza della Carina

Legal options are a start. The ultimate goal should be replacing Facebook, Twitter, and Google with local alternatives like Russia, China, and many other nations are already doing.

September 24, 2020(Tony Cartalucci – LD) – The Thaigovernmenthas begun legalproceedingsagainst US-based social media platforms includingFacebook, Twitter, and Google. This comes at a time when nations around the globe have begun pushing back against the abusive American tech firms and their role in advancing US foreign policy and in particular, illegal US interventions including war.

Not only are these US-based tech companies refusing to follow Thai laws regarding sedition, libel, and disinformation targeting national security and sociopolitical-economic stability, they have pursued a one-sided policy of censoring information critical of ongoing US-backed anti-government protests – shadow banning or outright censoring any and all accounts attempting to share information about documented US government funding behind the organizations involved. 

Virtually every aspect of current…

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At Pentagon, Fears Grow That Trump Will Pull Military Into Election Unrest

The Most Revolutionary Act

By Jennifer Steinhauer and

New York Times

WASHINGTON — Senior Pentagon leaders have a lot to worry about — Afghanistan, Russia, Iraq, Syria, Iran, China, Somalia, the Korean Peninsula. But chief among those concerns is whether their commander in chief might order American troops into any chaos around the coming elections.

President Trump gave officials no solace on Wednesday when he again refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power no matter who wins the election. On Thursday he doubled down by saying he was not sure the election could be “honest.”

His hedging, along with his expressed desire in June to invoke the 1807 Insurrection Act to send active-duty troops onto American streets to quell protests over the killing of George Floyd, has caused deep anxiety among senior military and Defense Department leaders, who insist they will do all they can to keep the armed…

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The Syria Boondoggle: Who’s Ready to Die in Vain?

The Most Revolutionary Act


Posted on

Antiwar.com

Mark my words: an American soldier will soon die for next to nothing in Syria. Here’s a mission that takes all the absurdity of America’s post-9/11 wars of choice to their logical conclusion. As such, this muddled and aimless operation must stand forever tall in the pantheon of U.S. foreign policy folly – right up there with the three Seminole Wars (1817-18, 1835-42, 1855-58, 1,608 dead troops); Nicaraguan “Banana Wars” (1910, 1912-25, 1927-33, 159 dead); the Russian Civil War’s “Siberia” intervention (1918-20, 424 dead); “Desert One” botched Iran hostage rescue (1980, 8 dead); Beirut “peacekeeping” (1982-84, 265 dead); the Grenada invasion (1983, 19 dead); and Somalia (1992-94, 43 dead). So, in Trump’s defense – and that of the Washington crowd that’s repeatedly pressured him to stay the Syria course – his latest folly is in good company.

Of course, US…

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9 1/2 years after meltdowns, no end in sight for Fukushima nuke plant decommissioning

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

The No. 1 reactor building is seen at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, on Sept. 1, 2020.

September 22, 2020

It has been some 9 1/2 years since the triple-meltdown disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in northeast Japan, and in early September I visited the plant to get a close-up look at the reactor buildings and find out how much progress is being made in dismantling them.

The trip began aboard a microbus, which stopped on an inland promontory running north to south at an elevation of 33.5 meters above sea level. Getting off the bus, I looked east, over the Pacific Ocean. And then I saw them, just 100 meters away or so: the buildings containing the plant’s No. 1 to 4 reactors.

When a tsunami triggered by the March 11, 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake slammed into the coastal facility…

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#FreeAssange: Doctor Diagnosed Julian Assange With Asperger’s Syndrome – The Dissenter 23 Sept. 2020

VICTIMS OF THE STATE

Doctor Diagnosed Julian Assange With Asperger’s Syndrome

Dr. Quinton Deeley said Assange’s autism causes him to ruminate about his “prospective circumstances at length,” and it creates a “sense of horror.”

Kevin GosztolaSep 23

Screen shot of WikiLeaks founder from the Frontline Club in 2012

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism, while detained in the Belmarsh high-security prison in London. This likely increases Assange’s risk of suicide if confined in restrictive prison conditions in the United States, according to a psychiatrist who testified at his extradition trial.

Dr. Quinton Deeley, who works for the National Health Service (NHS), conducted an Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) test on Assange and produced a report. He interviewed Assange for six hours in July.

Assange told Deeley he feared he would be held in isolation in a U.S. prison. He was afraid of the fresh indictment. He…

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