Nedum Onuoha: Former Man City defender says he does not feel safe in USA

Former Manchester City defender Nedum Onuoha says he does not feel “100% safe” in the USA.

Onuoha plays for Utah-based Real Salt Lake in Major League Soccer after spending six years at QPR.

“I am always very wary of how I behave and how it could be viewed by people who have power,” Onuoha, 33, told BBC Radio 5 Live.

“For me personally, overall I don’t like to say it but I have a fear and distrust towards police.”

Widespread protests have taken place across 75 US cities since George Floyd, an unarmed black man, died after being pinned down by a white police officer.

Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who kneeled on Floyd’s neck, has been charged with his murder. He and three other police officers have been sacked.

Sports stars have added their voices on social media with a ‘blackout’ – uploading a black image alongside a message of support.

Onuoha backed the protestors by saying: “It is emotional; it is something that is overdue to be honest. There has been a big wave of energy towards this, there has been a lot of talk about George Floyd – these issues have been around for decades.

“People have been trying to make noise. I have been trying to say things but it gets pushed away for too long. Enough is enough; what gives me strength is that it’s not just black people who are protesting now.

“The change will come but within that, there are so many nuanced things within the protest – for example, a lot of black people are scared to do what some of the white people are doing to the police.

“It’s crazy to see but it is very necessary. I am not going to say to them that they shouldn’t do anything because they haven’t been heard for this long so let them be heard now.”

‘If police read me wrong, they could take my life’

President Donald Trump has threatened to send in the military to quell growing civil unrest in the US, as dozens of people have been injured with authorities using tear gas and force to disperse protests.

Four officers were shot and injured on Monday night during unrest in St Louis, Missouri.

Onuoha added that the gun laws in the USA added to his sense of unease.

He said: “I have loved living in this country but there is [another] side of it.

“In the UK, I am more comfortable because if something happens it probably will not be deadly – but over here because of their rights it is more common that altercations become deadly. I am always very aware of that whenever I go around anywhere.

“I am comfortable but when it comes to any kind of brutality, if it’s from the police, if they read me the wrong way then my life could be taken. I feel that every single day. It is not just me but everybody else as well.

“I am not trying to be overly critical to the police, there are plenty of good police officers out there, but sometimes I feel like people put police on a pedestal and make them seem superhuman.

“But the fact is over here they are just people from society with a badge and a gun and a lot more power.

“If you worry about the man next door, why would you not worry about the person patrolling the streets who now has more power, more guns but the same views?

“I never go out and feel 100% safe.”

Mali teachers strike over COVID-19 fears as schools reopen

Teachers in the West African state of Mali went on strike Tuesday, the first day schools reopened after being closed for two months, over fears of inadequate protection against coronavirus.

Details of the number of students affected were unavailable, but seven teachers’ unions are striking, officials said, in a move that will hit public primary and secondary schools, as well as teacher-training colleges.

The government shut schools to curb coronavirus in late March. These reopened on Tuesday, but only for final year students who are facing exams.

Sambou Diadie Fofana, the general secretary of Mali’s National Union of Secondary School Teachers, told AFP that the strike was triggered by a “lack of measures (taken) in schools to protect everyone”.

Authorities have recorded 1,351 coronavirus cases in the country to date, with 78 fatalities.

Mali’s education ministry did not immediately respond about the number of students and teachers who returned to school on Tuesday.

In a meeting with education organisations on Monday, Mali’s Education Minister Mahamadou Famanta promised that facemasks and hand-washing kits would be available in schools, local media reported.

Moussa Diallo, 41, a unionised public-school teacher in the capital Bamako, said that soap and water had been made available in “several places” in his school.

Malian teachers also walked out of classrooms in January — before coronavirus hit — over a pay dispute.

Authorities had promised salary hikes in October 2016, which never transpired.

Civilian Conservation Corp: Lessons from the Great Depression

The Most Revolutionary Act

“American Experience”: Civilian Conservation Corp

Directed by Robert Stone (2009)

Film Review

Between the COVID19 lockdown, curfews in many cities, and impending martial law if the riots continue, the US economy is taking a severe hammering – which many predict will produce higher unemployment than the Great Depression.

This 2009 documentary looks at the Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) Roosevelt created when he took office in 1933. It served the dual the dual purpose of putting 2-3 million men to work and repairing the vast environmental damage wreaked by 200 years of laissez-faire agriculture. Prior to the 1930s, US farmers were unaware of the importance of using windbreaks to prevent erosion, replenishing soil nutrients with fertilizers, or rotation cropping. Until 1900, farmers and plantation owners simply abandoned their land when it became infertile and moved west.

In the 1930s, thousands of US farmers were forced to abandon their land, due to…

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Undercover officer pulls gun on Oakland protesters after cover blown

The Most Revolutionary Act

Nappy Newz

An undercover California highway patrol officer who had infiltrated protests against police violence in Oakland pulled a gun on demonstrators after his and his partner’s cover was blown.

According to accounts in the San Francisco Chronicle and the Berkeley Daily Planet, a few dozen protesters remaining from larger demonstrations yelled that two men in plainclothes were police.

“Just as we turned up 27th Street, the crowd started yelling at these two guys, saying they were undercover cops,” the Chronicle’s freelance photographer Michael Short told the newspaper on Thursday.

The Berkeley Daily Planet reported that the two men tried to walk away, but the couple of dozen remaining protesters “persisted, screaming at the two undercover cops”. The Planet said that an officer “pushed a protester aside”. The demonstrator allegedly pushed back and was tackled and handcuffed.

“Somebody snatched a hat off the shorter guy’s head and he was…

View original post 85 more words

Undercover officer pulls gun on Oakland protesters after cover blown

The Most Revolutionary Act

Nappy Newz

An undercover California highway patrol officer who had infiltrated protests against police violence in Oakland pulled a gun on demonstrators after his and his partner’s cover was blown.

According to accounts in the San Francisco Chronicle and the Berkeley Daily Planet, a few dozen protesters remaining from larger demonstrations yelled that two men in plainclothes were police.

“Just as we turned up 27th Street, the crowd started yelling at these two guys, saying they were undercover cops,” the Chronicle’s freelance photographer Michael Short told the newspaper on Thursday.

The Berkeley Daily Planet reported that the two men tried to walk away, but the couple of dozen remaining protesters “persisted, screaming at the two undercover cops”. The Planet said that an officer “pushed a protester aside”. The demonstrator allegedly pushed back and was tackled and handcuffed.

“Somebody snatched a hat off the shorter guy’s head and he was…

View original post 85 more words